Pulque The Drink of Gods.

Pulque, The Drink of Gods: An Exhibition

Christian Mieves

 

The American Italian photographer Tina Modotti shows in her photograph Exterior of Pulquería (ca. 1926) a typical Mexican tavern in Mexico City in the 1920s. The photograph depicts the frontal view of the bar, ‘La Palanca’, with a focus on the enigmatic and colourful murals. The image is somewhat emblematic for Modotti’s interest in everyday working-class life in Mexico City at that time, as pulquerias became popular meeting spots in central Mexico and distinctive to Mexican culture.   

 

Erika Servin’s exhibition Pulque: The Drink of Gods draws on this rich visual heritage of the pulquerias in Mexico. Pulque, the milky, foamy, alcoholic beverage typical to central Mexico is made from fermented agave juice since Aztecs times is a prism of Mexican history:  from its sacred role during Aztec times, restriction and prohibition during Spanish colonial reign and its re-emergence in the beginning of 19th century, pulquerias converted into popular working class meeting points and become a crucial parts of popular Mexican culture in the 19th century.

 

Erika Servin’s exhibition deals with the popular imagery of pulquerias and its mythology.  Servin born in Mexico City herself, became very familiar with the images of pulquerias during her childhood. The exhibition works predominantly through the medium of print, yet not only focuses on different aspects of the production and consumption of pulque and its distinct representations. The work also tests the notion familiarity / and otherness, perhaps exoticism of the images, when Servin prompts the viewer to look closely to detect similarities and differences between Western and non-Western influences.

 

The exhibition opens with stripes of print off- cuts on the wall. While the margins in prints and paintings are often an indicator for the making process, this stratum -like image unsurprisingly evokes associations with pulque fermentation of the agave juice in wooden barrels. Both the production of pulque and print are extensively process driven, produced behind doors when the precise moment of creation stays hidden from the viewer. 

 

Starting with the making process in a group of large monochromatic prints ‘De La Serie Pulque’ show the process of preparing and fermentation of the pulque. We can see large kettles where the juice from the agave plant is fermented. The ritual takes place in the tinacal, or pulque brewery, and follows a traditional process of fermentation done by the tinacalero , the head brewer. While the prints ‘De La Serie Pulque’ show the making process, the creation of the pulque itself, the fermentation or transformation process, stays hidden. It’s almost religious, ritualistic connotations of the fermentation process are kept secret, converting the brewery into church-like setting (Frances, 1947). Only small patterns of gold in the print suggest that the Aztecs considered the agave plant, the base for pulque, as sacred.  The Goddess Mayahuel, goddess of the agave plant and often pulque itself, features on other prints and reminds us that pulque was both used in rituals as well as for public consumption.  

 

The exhibition suggests an almost a natural evolution from the making to consumption of pulque. In the next group of work, Servin shows regulars of the pulqueria in a series of small drawings placed on a table. Here the interior of the pulqueria becomes essential:  the drawings propped up with foam pads resembling the traditional rudimentary seating of the tavern, the pulquerias. The bright pink line of the table top refers to the traditional colourful, opulent interior of the bars. It is almost the only element in the exhibition that breaks the muted colour scheme. Next to the table, prints placed on the floor seem to suggest a bottle and spillage of liquor on the ground. Adjacent to it one of the other guests of the pulquería, printed on a long spread of paper, kept upright only by wooden frame. A sign of the drunkenness?  This group of floor-based work and freestanding installation is suggestive and reflects the contrasting means of representation of abstract patterns and photography throughout the exhibition. The schematic rendering of the bottle on the floor, juxtaposed by a seemingly ‘naturalistic’ depiction of the spillage pitches different modes of representation. 

 

Similarly, in many of the other exhibits, Servin shows an overlap of image and pattern, ‘naturalistic’ representation and abstraction. The image of a young woman standing of front of a pulqueria, for instance, overlapped with the colour pattern of the typical wall design of the tavern.  This can be understood as ‘pressing’ two modes of representations together, arguably key part of the print process, becomes here also a conceptual tool. The concept of flattening emphasizes the elasticity and fluidity that often confounds notions of difference: the differences between Northern European and Mexican culture, the amalgamation of abstracted patterns merges with photographs capturing experiences of fragmentation and flux. Art theorist Leon Wainwright has suggested, the idea of a ‘hybrid compound’, for him as the place of production ‘in which tourism and the tropics collide at the locus of vision and the painted, printed and photographic image” (Wainwright 135).

 

Servin’s prints, patterns and photographic images debunk effectively assumptions of representational art being a transparent picture of everyday life. Many of the images can be seen as ‘hybrid’ compounds. Pulque, which became popular working-class beverage and pulquerias are frequented by hipsters nowadays, was also the drink of the Gods. The exhibition, ordered in a way that it can be understood as natural progression, shows as well the spiritual connotation Pulque has. The signals are more hidden, the Goddess Mayahuel in some of the prints, the haze of intoxication that departs from the clearly recognisable, transparent image. This transgresses the familiar and recognisable imagery.

 

The exhibition offers a reading of complex levels of mythology, colonialism, 

 as well as the tourist’s eye. The exhibition shows in various ways the transitions, the collision, transformations of images of pulque.  While the different images and viewpoints suggest a certain level of transparency, it is between the dots, lines and layers of images, where modes of representations are pressed together, that make the exhibition so exciting. Yet, the making of pulque has still been described as an almost sacred transformation, hidden in the tinacal. What we see are the remainders, as the actual transformation is taking place outside the print sheet.

 

Toor Frances (1947) A Treasury Of Mexican Folkways 

Wainwright, Leon.  "Solving Caribbean Mysteries: Art, Embodiment and an Eye for the Tropics." Small Axe 12.1 (2008): 133-144.

Pulque, la bebida de los Dioses.

Christian Mieves

 

La fotógrafa italiana estadounidense Tina Modotti muestra en su fotografía Exterior of Pulquería (ca. 1926) una típica taberna mexicana en la Ciudad de México en la década de 1920. La fotografía muestra la vista frontal del bar, 'La Palanca', con un enfoque en los enigmáticos y coloridos murales. La imagen es algo emblemática para el interés de Modotti por la vida cotidiana de la clase trabajadora en la Ciudad de México en ese momento, cuando las pulquerías se convirtieron en lugares de encuentro populares en el centro de México y distintivos de la cultura mexicana.

 

La exposición Pulque: La bebida de los dioses de Erika Servín se basa en esta rica herencia visual de las pulquerías en México. El pulque, la bebida lechosa, espumosa y alcohólica típica del centro de México se elabora a partir de jugo de agave fermentado ya que la época azteca es un prisma de la historia mexicana: desde su papel sagrado durante la época azteca, restricción y prohibición durante el reinado colonial español y su resurgimiento en a principios del siglo XIX, las pulquerías se convirtieron en puntos de encuentro de la clase trabajadora popular y se convirtieron en partes cruciales de la cultura popular mexicana en el siglo XIX.

 

La exposición de Erika Servín trata sobre el imaginario popular de las pulquerías y su mitología. La propia Servín, nacida en la Ciudad de México, se familiarizó mucho con las imágenes de las pulquerías durante su infancia. La exposición trabaja predominantemente a través de la gráfica, pero no solo se enfoca en diferentes aspectos de la producción y consumo de pulque y sus distintas representaciones. El trabajo también pone a prueba la noción de familiaridad y alteridad, quizás de exotismo de las imágenes, cuando Servín incita al espectador a mirar de cerca para detectar similitudes y diferencias entre las influencias occidentales y no occidentales.

 

La exposición se abre con impresiones de franjas de recortes en la pared. Si bien los márgenes en grabados y pinturas suelen ser un indicador del proceso de fabricación, esta imagen de estrato como era de esperar evoca asociaciones con la fermentación del pulque del jugo de agave en barriles de madera. Tanto la producción de pulque como la gráfica se basan en gran medida en procesos, producidos detrás de las puertas cuando el momento preciso de la creación permanece oculto al espectador.

 

Comenzando con el proceso de elaboración en un grupo de grandes grabados monocromáticos 'De La Serie Pulque' se muestra el proceso de preparación y fermentación del pulque. Podemos ver grandes hervidores donde se fermenta el jugo de la planta de agave. El ritual se lleva a cabo en la cervecería tinacal o pulque, y sigue un proceso tradicional de fermentación realizado por el tinacalero. Mientras que los grabados 'De La Serie Pulque' muestran el proceso de elaboración, la creación del pulque en sí, el proceso de fermentación o transformación, permanece oculta. Es casi religiosa, las connotaciones rituales del proceso de fermentación se mantienen en secreto, convirtiendo la cervecería en un entorno similar a una iglesia (Frances, 1947). Solo pequeñas muestras de oro en el grabado sugieren que los aztecas consideraban la planta de agave, la base del pulque, como sagrada. La Diosa Mayahuel, diosa de la planta de agave y, a menudo, del pulque mismo, aparece en otros grabados y nos recuerda que el pulque se usaba tanto en rituales como para consumo público.

 

La exposición sugiere una evolución casi natural desde la elaboración hasta el consumo de pulque. En el siguiente grupo de trabajo, Servín muestra a los habituales de la pulquería en una serie de pequeños dibujos colocados sobre una mesa. Aquí el interior de la pulquería se vuelve imprescindible: los dibujos apuntalados con almohadillas de espuma se asemejan a los tradicionales asientos rudimentarios de la taberna, las pulquerías. La línea rosa brillante del tablero de la mesa se refiere al tradicional interior colorido y opulento de las barras. Es casi el único elemento de la exposición que rompe el esquema de colores apagados. Junto a la mesa, las impresiones colocadas en el suelo parecen sugerir una botella y un derrame de licor en el suelo. Contiguo a él, uno de los otros invitados de la pulquería, impreso en un papel largo, mantenido en posición vertical solo por marco de madera. ¿Un signo de la embriaguez? Este grupo de trabajo en el suelo e instalación independiente es sugerente y refleja los medios contrastantes de representación de patrones abstractos y fotografías a lo largo de la exposición. La representación esquemática de la botella en el suelo, yuxtapuesta por una representación aparentemente "naturalista" del derrame presenta diferentes modos de representación.

 

De manera similar, en muchas de las otras exhibiciones, Servín muestra una superposición de imagen y patrón, representación "naturalista" y abstracción. La imagen de una mujer joven de pie frente a una pulquería, por ejemplo, se superponía con el patrón de color del típico diseño de la pared de la taberna. Esto puede entenderse como "presionar" dos modos de representaciones juntos, posiblemente parte clave del proceso de impresión, que se convierte aquí también en una herramienta conceptual. El concepto de aplanamiento enfatiza la elasticidad y fluidez que a menudo confunden las nociones de diferencia: las diferencias entre la cultura del norte de Europa y la cultura mexicana, la amalgama de patrones abstractos se fusiona con fotografías que capturan experiencias de fragmentación y flujo. El teórico del arte León Wainwright ha sugerido la idea de un 'compuesto híbrido', para él como el lugar de producción 'en el que el turismo y los trópicos chocan en el lugar de la visión y la imagen pintada, impresa y fotográfica' (Wainwright 135).

 

Los grabados, los motivos y las imágenes fotográficas de Servín desacreditan efectivamente las suposiciones de que el arte representativo es una imagen transparente de la vida cotidiana. Muchas de las imágenes pueden verse como compuestos "híbridos". El pulque, que se popularizó como bebida de la clase trabajadora y hoy en día frecuentan las pulquerías, también era la bebida de los dioses. La exposición, ordenada de manera que se pueda entender como una progresión natural, muestra también la connotación espiritual que tiene Pulque. Las señales son más ocultas, la Diosa Mayahuel en algunas de las estampas, la bruma de la embriaguez que se aparta de la imagen transparente, claramente reconocible. Esto transgrede las imágenes familiares y reconocibles.

 

La exposición ofrece una lectura de niveles complejos de mitología, colonialismo, así como el ojo del turista. La exposición muestra de diversas formas las transiciones, el choque, las transformaciones de las imágenes del pulque. Si bien las diferentes imágenes y puntos de vista sugieren un cierto nivel de transparencia, es entre los puntos, las líneas y las capas de imágenes, donde los modos de representación se presionan, lo que hace que la exposición sea tan emocionante. Sin embargo, la elaboración del pulque todavía se ha descrito como una transformación casi sagrada, escondida en el tinacal. Lo que vemos son los restos, ya que la transformación real tiene lugar fuera de la hoja de impresión. 

 

Toor Frances (1947) A Treasury Of Mexican Folkways 

Wainwright, Leon.  "Solving Caribbean Mysteries: Art, Embodiment and an Eye for the Tropics." Small Axe 12.1 (2008): 133-144.

Thanks to:

 

Newcastle University

Yolanda Canales

Joseph Sallis

Sean Mallen

Mark “Burnie” Burns

 

Text /Conversation 

Christian Mieves is painter based in the North East of England. He is Lecturer in Fine Art at 

Newcastle University. His paintings have been shown at exhibitions in Germany, Mexico, Spain and the United Kingdom.

Instagram @christian_mieves

https://mieves.info

 

 

Video/web

Callum McDonnell is artist that works primarily with video.  He creates playful mesmeric snapshots of the human form through abstraction, isolation and repetition, depicting the familiar body under unfamiliar constraints.

Instagram @callum.mcdonnell

 

 

Photography

Jade Sweeting is an artist interested in archives and recycling found imagery, where process is a main element, alongside analogue techniques, from darkroom photography to printmaking.

Instagram @jadesweeting

 

VIEWING ROOM

B55A1575.jpg
B55A1575.jpg
pulquemiel.jpg
pulquemiel.jpg
B55A1437.jpg
B55A1437.jpg
detail blue.jpg
detail blue.jpg
mujer.jpg
mujer.jpg
pouring.jpg
pouring.jpg
B55A1131.jpg
B55A1131.jpg
76 x 56 cm photoetching, Somerset paper 280 gm
76 x 56 cm photoetching, Somerset paper 280 gm